Understanding Britain’s Creative Economy In Arts And Culture

Originally, the term creative economy originated from “Creative Britain”, the political slogan of the British Labor Party. One of the policy agendas of the Labor Party government in 1997, the British government at that time created a government agency such as the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) to foster the ‘Creative Industry’ in earnest. Terminology. The Blair regime continued to develop Thatcher’s neoliberal policy and continue to develop high-tech, high value-added industries rather than labor-intensive manufacturing industries.

London’s Creative Industries

British government’s creative economy policy

The UK’s Department of Culture and Media (DCMS, Dept for Culture, Media and Sports) uses the creative culture industry as’ individual creative talent and technology to create intellectual property rights, based on which it creates value and employment and economic growth. It is defined as the ‘towing industry’.

The ‘Creative Culture Industry Classification Report’ prepared by DCMS sets the domain of the creative industry as covering the entire cultural industry, and specifically, films, music, performances, advertisements, architecture, art, leisure, publishing, broadcasting, radio, etc. It is expanding to the field of.

Global Mecca For The Creative Culture

Thanks to the policies of the British government, the UK has emerged as a global mecca for the creative culture and content industry. In particular, the export volume of movies and popular music has grown to be the second-largest in the world after the United States, and the Premier League has become the world’s best professional soccer league and has gained the competitiveness of the sports industry.

In the field of design, animation, and games, it has first-class competitiveness. Among them, the Harry Potter series has caught the attention of people around the world in the publishing and movie markets, and has established itself as a symbol of ‘Creative Britain’.┬áThe British creative industry showed an average annual growth rate of 6.9% over the period of the Blair regime’s power in 1997-2006, which is more than twice the average annual economic growth rate in the U.K.

Moving to London is a great opportunity to witness what the U.K. has to offer in terms of arts and culture. We are all familiar with Harry Potter but there is more to it than movies. Take the opportunity to view great visual arts content in the film and video sectors, the performing arts, and the music sector.